Saturday, 21 October 2017

Downward L 1



Here are some examples where the choice of upward or downward L is used for vowel indication. The four paragraphs below deal with initial vowels. If the word starts with a vowel and the L is followed by a plain horizontal stroke, the L is written downwards. If there is no initial vowel, and those strokes follow the L, then the L is written upwards. Remember that L is generally an upstroke, and there has to be a reason for it to be written downwards. There are other reasons to use the downward L and these are all explained in detail on the Theory L Forms page*.



Alex and Alexander look just alike as they are twins. They are studying electrical* engineering and the use of electricity* in industry. They became familiar with the electron microscope, electronic* equipment and the history of alchemy. They were elected onto the students committee. Their election means that they have been allocated a small office in the admin block. They had to investigate* allegations of cheating in the exams. I like to make sure I have locked the doors. I noticed a lack of security at the lakeside building and a leak which was located in the lecture room.

* "electrical, electricity, electronic" Contractions

* "investigate" Omits the lightly sounded first T


Mr Alec Alcock has had a meeting with Mrs Laycock regarding this matter. They thought there was a legacy of laxity regarding security in the offices. We did not* know whether the bottle found contained alcohol or an alkali mixture. We did some tests to find out whether it was alcoholic, acidic or alkaline. Mr Logan and Mr Elgin play in the football league. Their team badge is quite elegant and shows an elk and an alligator. It is made of aluminium and the figures are set on a lemony coloured background. They keep a copy of it in the clubhouse alcove, as there is a lack of space in the reception area.

* "we did not" Not phrased, as that would be "we do not". Adding the vowel to "did" would be "didn't" so the only option is to write the "did not" on the line.


I met Alan last week* at college. His sister Ellen did not want to be alone for the evening so she came along to the meeting. They have rescued the ailing business with the help of Mr Allen and his wife Elena*. Their daughter Eleanor assisted with the office work. There was one lone person in the room. His name is Len but we call him Lennie. Later on my friends Lena and Elaine arrived wearing their long party dresses. Leon also came dressed as an alien. He is from Illinois in the United States* but now lives in Ealing in the United Kingdom*.

* Omission phrases "las(t w)eek)"

* Omission phrase (U)nited K(ingdom)". If the text said "UK" then write as pronounced "yoo-kay"

* Omission phrase N-s-s for "United States". Add stroke K for "United States (of) America". If the text said "US" or "USA" then write those letters in lowercase longhand, this is quicker than attempting a phonetic outline.


I went to the doctor at High Elms Clinic to get something for this ailment. In the waiting room the element in the light bulb had gone and so there was no illumination. By a process of elimination, we finally discovered the cause. This enabled us to eliminate the problem. Dr Lamb advised me to drink lime juice or dilute lemon juice. I did not give some lame excuse as I knew that my appointment with the health visitor was looming. I will not be lamenting this situation, and I am now improving. I will now be able to visit the Alhambra next year. Thoughts of my past Olympic achievements brought a lump to my throat. It was the ultimate highlight of my sporting career. But my doctor had given me an ultimatum and now I take it easy on my allotment.


The next examples deal with final vowels. After F V SK Ray and Yay, the L is downward. If a final vowel follows the L in these words, then it is upward, and this is continued on into any derivative. The downward versions have the advantage that the motion of the curve is continued. Note that some words ending in “-ful” and “-fully” use a hooked F stroke.


I would feel awful if I should fail the exam next Fall. But I have a feeling I will be successful, as I have been careful to practise and remember all the useful advice*. Falling into error and failing the exam is therefore not an option. We fell on the chocolate cake and had our fill of it until we were quite full. We had fallen into temptation and this may have been folly for our figures, but it was fuel for our muscles. We will follow it with lots* of exercise and we shall be following the advice in the book. Our fellow workers are fully behind us in this and we will successfully avoid the consequences. This will be followed by a period of time when we will be usefully and carefully employed in filling out forms, filing papers and writing follow-up letters.

* "advice" Insert the first vowel, as "device/devices" could also make sense

* "lots" "masses" Always insert the first vowel, as these are similar in outline and meaning


The weather was foul, in fact* it was quite vile, but we carried on over the hill and down into the vale. We saw a vole on the riverbank where the ground is level. My companion Mr Lovell said we should avail ourselves of the facilities at the nearby Villa Hotel. A table was available and we ordered veal pie. We continued our walk through the lovely green valley. We greatly value our countryside and think it is the most valuable asset in this area. I have been learning the skill of piano playing. I have a good brain in my skull and I have spent much time practising the scales. In other words, I have been scaling the heights of musical achievement. In my spare time* I have built a scale model of the tower. Mr Scully said that the fish was slimy and scaly, and looked rather sickly.

* Omission phrase "in (f)act"

* "spare time" Halving for the T of "time"


The pupil has a real problem with this subject and really needs some help with it. I have kept to the rules and I even sought a ruling from my teacher. His name is Mr Reilly and I rely on him to answer my questions*. After the class I walked down the lane past the railings and went home by rail. I was wearing the correct apparel for the very rainy night. On Monday I will be going to the car rally, where I hope the crowd will not be unruly. John studied at Yale University and stayed on campus over the Yule* period. He was tempted to yell at the driver in the yellow car. He told him, “You’ll have to wait here for a while.” There are three words where the medial* L is downward to make a compact outline. The newspaper column gave a review of this film. I had to turn down the volume of the radio. (1085 words)

* "questions" Optional contraction

* "Yule" Note that "Yuletide" has an upward L in order to be able to join the T+D

* "medial" Always insert the diphone, as "middle" is the same outline and same meaning